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Antonio’s Roast Chicken

Antonio’s Roast Chicken



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Crank your oven to 550 degrees F, or 500, if that’s as high as it will go.

Rinse off the chicken, pat it dry, set it in an ovenproof pan, and go crazy chiropractor on it. Using your hands, crack its back and breasts, bust up its leg joints. Really work it over. Don’t be gentle. Think of yourself as a meat tenderizer. The chicken will slump down in the pan.

Drizzle the olive oil all over the bird, and rub salt and pepper on the skin and in the cavity. Squeeze the juice from the lemon over it, then stuff the lemon rind into the cavity, too. Antonio rubs the chicken with butter, not olive oil, but I’m not big on butter in Mexican cooking. I like to make tacos with this chicken when it’s done, and something about butter and chiles just doesn’t work for me. If you want, you can toss about a tablespoon of butter in the cavity of the chicken. That’s a nice touch for extra tenderness and juiciness, without getting too heavy on the butter flavor. But, again, that’s not required.

Put the chicken in the oven and blast it at that high heat for 40 minutes. You might think you’re going to burn it. Don’t worry. You won’t. No need to open the oven to check. You don’t want to lose that heat. After 40 minutes, turn the temperature down to 175 degrees F and leave the chicken in there for another 40 minutes.

Take the chicken out, let it rest for a few minutes, then go to town. The skin will be beautifully crisp, with lots of caramelized juices in the pan. And the meat will be so tender you can pull the bird apart with your hands.

Tear up the meat that way, or chop it roughly on a cutting board, and serve with warm tortillas, fresh salsa, guacamole—whatever you like on your tacos. Or just eat that chicken straight up. It rocks either way.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


This Fall-Off-the-Bone Chicken Recipe Is Better Than Any Rotisserie Bird

Welcome to Never Fail, a semi-regular column where we wax poetic about the recipes that never, ever let us down. This week: the slow roasted chicken recipe that editor in chief Adam Rapoport just couldn't live without.

A simple roast chicken is supposed to be simple. But whenever I make one, I’m always, like, “Wait a minute! Is the dark meat done yet?” Or… “I’m pretty sure the dark meat is done, but did I overcook the white meat?” If I were texting you about it, there's a good chance that I’d use that grimacing emoji face more than once.

Try this recipe, and you may never set eyes on a rotisserie chicken ever again.

Photo by: Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

A few years ago, though, Carla Lalli Music, food director of Bon Appétit, started talking up her "faux-tisserie chicken." I’ll admit, she had me at the name. That’s clever branding, I thought to myself. But can you really make a slow roasted chicken at home that’s as fall-off-the-bone tender and succulent as those $12 birds you get at your corner deli place? You know, the ones plopped onto a little paper boat and tucked into one of those foil-lined bags. I love those things. Doesn’t everyone?

So next thing I know, I’m doing like Carla told me to in the pages of Bon Appétit—grinding up some fennel seeds and rubbing up a four-pound bird with it and some red pepper flakes, chopped herbs and an ample amount of salt and olive oil. Into the roasting pan go some chopped up olive-oiled Yukon Golds and the chicken rests on top of them.

And then, here’s the genius part—the chicken roasts not at a blistering 425°, but at a casual 300°. Nice and low and slow, for a good three hours. I literally ran out to run some errands, and when I came back a few hours later, my God, did the apartment smell good. If I were still texting you right now, I’d use that new head-exploding emoji.

I pulled the chicken out, and set it on a cutting board to rest. Meanwhile, I placed the chicken fat-laden potatoes in the roasting pan back in the oven and hit them with the broiler. Crisp, moist and golden, they were like potato candy. And that chicken—it really was fall-apart tender, and incredibly succulent. Maybe I’d tone down the amount of red pepper flakes next time, I told myself. And the fennel, while nice, wasn’t essential. But would I make it again? Absolutely. And I have, time again. And, no, it never fails.


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